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with these folks day in and day out, not only built trust between us and the afghans but it gave them the ability to prg on a daily basis. so the other frustration was the coalition effort. there was a lot of people with great intentions willing to help shared by many different countries. the frustration was many different countries, there's many different ways of doing things. so we would be out there telling the afghans, this is how you conduct police operations, this is how we do police training, this is how you hold your weapon and engage the enemy, and then several weeks later another force would come in and not that it was necessarily wrong, but it was different. so from the afghan perspective, incredibly frustrating to understand where they are going and what they need to be doing and what is right and what is wrong. so in closing if someone were to ask me from 2010 to where we're at now, is there hope i would say, yes, there is. as we stand down our combat forces and shift to an advisory and a training role i think we're going to be able to take our lessons lerbed -- learned and ensu
us in person. all the classes at the pacific energy center are free of charge. thanks for showing us an actual system being installed and thank you for being with us. hope to see you soon. >> welcome. we are here doing our building san francisco tour. we're going to have a very interesting tour of elevators in sanford cisco. we have all gotten into an elevator, the doors have closed, and it has carried us to our destination. have you ever wondered how elevators were -- work? we check out the need outside the elevator using current technology and we learn about the latest destination elevated technology all here in san francisco. we will also visit the machinery where all the behind- the-scenes gears control these incredible machines. we are very fortunate today to have an expert with those who is going to walk us are around elevators in san francisco. can you tell us about the history of elevators in san francisco? the measure -- >> sure. the history of elevator technology evolves with the city. first elevators were installed for moving materials in the 1860's. in the 1870's, the fir
of the people, all of the different starting up companies here and those that are inventing with us, thank them for celebrating innovation month in such a exemplary way. and i think we're going to have a lot more to announce before this month is out, including on our way to the world series. thank you very much. (applause) >> now, if i may introduce our partner in crime here, board president david chiu who is also going to be complimenting us with all of his efforts at the board. come on up, david. (applause) >> good morning. i am incredibly excited to be here today for a couple of reasons. first of all, the hatchery is one of my favorite places in the city. there is truly a bee hive of activity of the newest innovations that san francisco will be famous for. i also love the fact that just a couple of blocks from here is where our san francisco giants are moving on to the world series. but just in this room, all of you are giants and making sure that san francisco is the world champion when it comes to innovation. >>> 13 years ago, i like all of you started a company. i started in i-ti a techno
don't yet know will all be on this land for all of us for years to come. thank you so much for your support. we're going to continue to need it as we go forward building. thank you. [ applause ] >> thank you, jule. i see another former library commission president and former commissioner charles. thank you for your great service as well. [ applause ] when we talk about partnerships, there is no other group that better defines partnerships for the city and support and the public-private partnership than the friends of the san francisco public library and have provided the funding for all of our furniture, the fixtures and all of the equipment. it truly owns our library in that regard. it's my pleasure to introduce of the executive director of the friends of the san francisco libraries scott. >> [ applause ] . >> thank you. it's a pleasure to be here. as luis said we had this fantastic public-private partnership for 23 branchs and now is your opportunity if you want to join 4400 other san franciscans who raised $12.7 million for other branchs we invite you to join us back at tent and
. we have investors here to help us with the new ideas. this last 20% of recycling is going to be the hardest but the most enjoyable. this city will continue to innovate. we will embrace clean technologies. we we will certificate green start and demonstrations that we will see today and october is innovation month and gratifying for those and happy clean tech day in san francisco. thank you very much. [applause] >> it is awesome to have the mayor announce that right here at green start. we are thrilled to be a part of that. it's true a year ago mayor lee asked "what can we do to help?" and we said we have lots of companies that want to test pilot things and deploy things and how can san francisco be a part of that and to see this come together so quickly is incredibly rewarding and testament to the leadership you're providing and san francisco is lucky to have you as our mayor. thank you >> san francisco is home to some of the most innovative companies of the 21st century. this pioneering and forward looking spirit is alive in san francisco government as well. the new
. what does that mean to us? we run water, power, and sewer. so, those are some of the biggest things involved in lead platinum. ♪ ♪ >> by late 2008 the project, as we got the contractor on board and we were able to start pricing it, we're a multi-, multi-, multi-million dollar over budget. >> the story a lot of people don't know after we got select today do this project, the first price we came in with was $180 million. and the city said, you know, this is a great building, but we just don't want to spend that much money. so, the project was on the verge of being canceled. >> if you're looking at why this building came to be, in many ways it also included mayor gavin newsome, particularly, who really had an affection for this building. he saw the design. he saw the potential. he wanted to make sure that that building got built. and he said, do what you need to do, but please, if you can make that building work, we need to have that building in civic center. >> i happened to be at a green conference santa clara. he said you shouldn't cancel that project. can you work with us? mic
it in and it will make us more effective. we did an exercise back in may in preparation for this and developed a pretty detailed concept of operations. we built load plan, timelines, spare parts lists, we really got into the weeds, thinking about the second and third tier effects, so i want my relief to understand that and i want him to know where that plan is so he can pull it right off the shelf if this ever happens and be ready to respond quickly instead of trying to figure this all out when we need to be getting underway. >> i'll boil mine down into just one, and that is i will pass to my relief to continue to support events like this and look for opportunities to continue to learn how we best in the military can integrate with our civilian and federal contemporaries to be prepared for an eventuality that we hope will never come, but we certainly should be prepared for. so the one thing i'm passing on is keep the momentum. >> thank you, all. one other benefit that was cited in the after action review and also was mentioned today is the chance it meet someone else from the other agency. we also h
corps. that's an area where we could use some improvement. our forces deployed to the western pacific certainly understand this, and they pass it on among themselves. the forces we deploy from southern california and the east coast that float into theater understand disaster assistance and humantarian response very well. that hasn't quite migrated itself into the institutional arena in terms of forces stationed here in the united states as it would relate to defense support to civil authorities. i think that's primarily -- this is not a primary mission for us. it's something that we do pay attention to, of course, as we deploy overseas. not necessarily forces we have here in the states. we do understand immediate response, rolling out the gate to help our neighbors in an immediate nature, but i think not so much in terms of mobilization and deploying inside our country. so, this is an area where opportunities like san francisco fleet week will allow us for, and i believe at some point really incorporate this in some internal doctrine that will benefit us in the event that this is a re
, but it is beginning to be very tightly regulated. tell us, when people come in to buy, what is it that they like? what are they actually buying? >> a lot of it has to do with style. first is for the lab faucet's. you have the widespread, the two handles, hot and cold. very modern design. >> people like modern. >> people like modern, but we are in san francisco, so we get a wide range. then the one hand, very popular, ada-approved. saves water. very easy to use >> > one of the standards for commercial, not residential, is that you have to be able to operate equipment with a single operation without tight grasping or pinching. so this actually allows that to happen. you can operate without having to grab and pitch and twist something. this is very user-friendly. it is also reduced flow, and you do not have to have two faucet's running. >> only have to cut one hole in your credit. . granite. this is really traditional, very popular fish. >> nice. and this is, -- chrome, and brushed nicke. >> as far south as there, and showers are popular right now. rain heads are popular, but you want something that is f
participation from city, civilian agencies from all around the region and all of us our fabulous united states military, the coast guard has been fabulous in providing assets to protect everybody out on the bay. it is one heck of a logistics program to get this whole program started and here we are the culmination of nearly a year of planning. we've had exercises, we've had lots of meetings down in san francisco up at the marines memorial, this is a fabulous program, we had a great medical exchange yesterday. senior leaders seminar third year in a row has gotten a lot of attention. we have a lot of new people who haven't been here for the past couple years, we have a lot of people who have been here for the last 3 years, and one of the major consistent people who has been behind this whole program is the chairman of the san francisco fleet week association, general -- major general mike myers who i'm going to ask to come up and make is remarks. >> thank you, lewis. when i accepted the responsibilities for organizing san francisco's fleet week, the guidance given to me by our honorary co-c
of a big differentiation factor in developing this. so, as far as creating access to the public, using the open data sets, and creating exposure to neighborhoods that you probably traditionally didn't even think were there, we realized there were 1200 different facilities all through the park -- all through the city as we were going out to explore. and upon our own discovery, and i being a local native, i didn't know about 800 of them. so, as we move forward into the future, taking this, working with some other departments like san francisco arts, we're creating access for people, creating efficiency with the government being able to manage transactions, creating a platform for people to actually interact with the city on a level that hasn't been done before. so, ideally, using the san francisco rec and park, the future san francisco arts app, using our mobile commerce to manage that is creating jobs, revenue, and efficiency for the public and tourists to be able to navigate san francisco in a way that hasn't been done before. thank you. >> all right. (applause) >> so, we're going to s
movement and projects is listed here. the richmond rec center is one $45,000 which gives us a project of just over $501,000. the fund balance that you have displayed in attachment a in the deferred maintenance contingency is $558,000 which allows for a contingency budget line listed here or about 12% for project management contracting fees and any cost variance so in summary our proposal for deferred maintenance for 12-13 is the water infrastructure and the projects i just described plus the 12% contingency for soft costs and cost variance and that pencils out at the $558,000 which is our proposal to you, so the staff recommendation would be that you recommend the $558,000 from the fy12-13 open space contingency serve to fund these projects. >> thank you. commissioner harrison. >> yeah. i would like to move this thing forward. i want to commend you for the use of this money. this is an excellent use of this money. i think really in the big of things this is what it was proposed to do. i think what you did in the past with the money is excellent. these projects are ge
to the party and help us with, not only how we can interact with the military, but also we say to ourselves, it's also up to us to do everything we can for ourselves. we're not kind of an outfit, it's easier for them to collaborate with us. so, all of these things are important to us as we have these exercises. so, i say this is a very worthwhile enterprise that will keep going. i tip my hat to my friend mike who really has been leading us in these efforts. and now i say as also the slogan, i guess you call it this morning, maybe it's what the navy says. i think it's a very good phrase. a global force for good. that's what we've been practicing, a global force for good. thank you. (applause) >> thank you, sir. thank you. thank you very much, sir. (applause) >> and for all of you, tomorrow we're going to have the former secretary defense william perry speak. and the final speaker tomorrow will be the commander of north com, it will be the first time the northern command... >> ladies and gentlemen, welcome to day two of the senior leader seminar for san francisco fleet week 2012. we had a great d
. that is being rolled out at education, energy, treasury, u.s. aid, other agencies as well. these programs are celebrating the use of open data and hopefully will provide some additional support. i think there are even folks here who have been part of these events. we're excited for that continued support and hope you can all join this initiative in the neutral. -- future. >> so, earlier you were talking a little about kind of how san francisco came in in terms of actually ading the officer. more broadly how do you think san francisco compares and what are some of the other cities that are doing really well in terms of open data? >> i should be clear. when san francisco is third, we have a pact. i'll add to that actually. what's great in san francisco is there is not just going to be a chief data officer. there is also the office of civic innovation. jay's team, shannon's team. by having both of those units in place i think there is going to be a really powerful team. because you can't just open up the data. you have to do things like this, where you get the community together or you have
found. the cost was close to 30 billion u.s. dollars. how we organize, well, we have something similar that you have. we have the national emergency office under the internal affair minister and they have offices in the different counties, in the different places in chile this emergency office request aid directly to the joint chief of staff and joint chief of staff to the army, navy or air force and then we move the pieces to put the aid where they need it. the scenario, the beginning when we face this was the same thing we are talking about in this seminar. the necessity was access because everything was, the delivery was absolutely hampered because of the roads so we have to clean it. water, food, electricity and communications. another need at that time to do that is field hospital generators, housing, sat coms, purifying water systems and mobile bridges. so the force was at the beginning just to distribute the aid and at the end start doing law enforcement when the government declared catastrophe and the president gave us the authority to do that. so we move the army inland, n
. there is a circus company that i have been fortunate enough to work with the last couple of years. i use elements of dance and choreography and combine that with theater techniques. a lot of the work is content- based, has a strong narrative. the dancers have more of a theatrical feel. i think we are best known for our specific work. in the last 15 years, spending a lot of time focusing on issues that affect us and are related to the african-american experience, here in the united states. i had heard of marcus shelby and had been in join his work but never had the opportunity to meet him. we were brought together by the equal justice society specifically for this project. we were charged with beginning work. marquez and i spent a lot of time addressing our own position on the death penalty, our experiences with people who had been incarcerated, family members, friends of friends. pulling our information. beyond that, we did our own research. to create a picture that resonated with humanity. it is the shape of a house. in this context, it is also small and acts like a cell. i thought that was an i
sure we have a motion in front of us first. >> i moved it. >> moved and seconded? >> second. >> second. the motion is before us. >> david filcoff. thank you for the discussion. i'm excited about this policy. i get very excited about commission policy. i may be the only one, but hey. so, i was -- >> careful with the podium. >>> yes, sorry. i'm sorry i was actually not at the cac meeting last month because it was just before a jewish holiday. but i had some quick comments on this. i'm very supportive of the proposal, but just had some minor tweaks. on page 1 of the policy itself under personnel management, it says personal costs, i believe that should probably read "personnel costs." with regard to commissioner moran's amendment, if just want to be careful that we're not requiring some particular set of findings in the budget adoption resolution for each increase and each enterprise or any particular line item that exceeds the cost of inflation if that -- if the intent -- and i understand it, with the intent that there be some general statement in an adopted budget that makes those kinds
things don't always go as planned and certainly our experiences in combat has showed us there and prior experience with disasters have outlined that even though there's a well-defined system of response it doesn't always work out. what i defined yesterday was that logistics problems may get in the way and interfere with medical surge planning as is outlined. putting resources where they are needed in a huge disaster may outstrip the ability of local authorities to do that because roads are out. the niche we have as the marine corps assets we have the ability to locate some of our resources like shock trauma platoons, that's what we do in combat and we have experience with that and that may be something that may be of benefit to this process. >> during the last panel, mr. cahen mentioned it's so important to understand the resources that his agency has versus the ones that the military has and he said at one point they started looking down in terms of typing, i have this, you have this, how are we going to respond and get the resources we need to deal with the incident. i'd like to hea
exciting here. please join us for "bluilding sf." joining janessa and i today is andre. thanks for coming. we have had some great times in the past with some of these shows. you have been kitchen and bath in the past. >> i'm an architect. i do a lot of construction work. or >> do people look for when they do a bathroom remodels? >> that is a good question. kitchens are the ultimate and social room, while bathrooms are kind of the opposite. bathrooms, like kitchens, are part of homes and houses, so they are part of architecture, and they are opportunities for people to express themselves, to express their style. they are just an important element in the house is in san francisco. >> i think we can talk about how bathrooms had changed in san francisco. the old-style we're used to have a separate compartment for the bathtub, and now, we have a whole different concept. >> traditionally in san francisco with victorian and edwardian, we had split bathrooms. a separate room for a toilet, and a second room for a tub. i have done literally dozens of projects where we try to combine them. the diffe
, strike teams from water companies. they simply make a call and tell us we need 10, 12, 15, it's our obligation to put that together and get it to them. they are worried about the incident in their jurisdiction which they have to correct. it's our responsibility to reach bond those borders as their extension to bring in the reserves that they need to maintain that kaupblt newt of operation and then where we function through the state utility operations center and the state operations center to make sure that we have that kind of access and that kind of assistance. we need caltrans, we're going to need chp, we're going to need cal fire, we need dwr, they are invested in restoring their critical infrastructure and it's our responsibility to reach across those lines to get that kind of access to keep that kind of restoration underway. >> thank you. mr. brig. >> in terms of establishing standards for resill yepbs, absolutely, we have done that. again as i mentioned earlier, to get our customers to fund all these capital projects we did up a contract with them. this is what you're gett
and feeding me cookers and going to the community gardens. i used the lemons and if the stars align and measure b is successful i think there is a great opportunity for the department on a master plan and i encourage the department to look into that when the stars to align for us. the second item i would also like to say yesterday i had the pleasure of attending supervisor kim's office the open space task force. it was a great meeting. staff did a great job giving us overview of the open space that is in district six, the opportunities that might be available. it was a great collaborative and community effort to create ideas how to create more open space in district six and i would like to thank the staff for that and giving the overview and there are good take aways and we will encouraged for that area so thank you very much and that's all i have to report. >> thank you commissioner. let's move on to the next item. >> okay. is there any public comment on this item? seeing none public comment is closed. we're on item three, the general manager's report. >> thank you commission
of everybody else using the park. ♪ ♪ >> this is the fifth year of our partnership with another planet entertainment, where another planet puts on probably the greatest music festival in america for three days here in golden gate park. >> we work with them a lot to prevent and not have any problems. and what we have done with them is have roads built and have pieces under whatever equipment is parked. they do all of that. and then when it gets removed, they have very little damage. >> for me as a gardener and having to stay here and work after they leave, i am more than happy when i see their greening team come through and green everything up. >> we have given them pieces that they can use, and pieces that they can't use. so we are allowing them, again, because we have irrigation in the ground so they can use, and if they put up a tent they can stake a tent in some places, they can't stake a tent in other places. so we are protecting the golden gate park asset. >> so what is really special about the partnership is not just the incredible music, that about 70,000 of our closest friends
of a home. this is one of the tools we use here to assess solar energy. five years ago i was in a position similar to that of many of you. i was a homeowner thinking about solar electricity for my home. i had to answer a bunch of questions. one, does this stuff work? would it work on my home and most importantly, can i afford it? well, i did the research. i bought a system. now i get to share that knowledge and that experience with you. for the next 30 minutes, we'll have a class in solar basics and we'll go out in the field and see an actual solar system being installed. 30 minutes, solar basics, stay with me. >> let's talk about the technology, what is it and how does it work? there are three types of solar actually when you sauk about solar. i want to avoid the confusion to make sure we're focusing on the right one. two of them involve heating water and they're very viable technologies, can be very coast effective but we're not going to deal with them right now. one is solar pool heating. it pumps the water up there, heats it, runs it through there, the sun heats it and back into the po
if we can talk to each other. we had the national guard above us in a helicopter, even though it was really foggy, they didn't see much, but they demonstrated proof of concept that they can connect the video feed. we learned there are limitations in things of band width and video feed that i'm not qualified to talk about, i'm strictly a push to talk guy. we know as a city when the earth moves, things fall, we get a lot of rubble. that's going to be one of our critical, critical things we have to do. we have to be able to move material and personnel and one of the ways we're going to be doing that is how do we actually get the debris off the road so we can put things back to work. so that was the command of control exercise. we had the marine corps, the navy, and the national guard all working with our department of public works figuring out how would they work together. we didn't give them a lot of coaching, we just kind of put them in a tent and said here is your scenario, here's some problems, and we wanted them to work it out and they did. so it was a very successful yea
command air control. those are operations that are familiar to us and they are, it's a great exercise for us tactically as well. we are able to integrate with cal fire itself with the objective being the fire itself. those work out for us here and we can go ahead and use those skills forward as well. thank you very much, we appreciate the opportunity. >> thank you, i'd like to thank our panelists and open it up to our group for any questions of our panelists today. yes, sir, secretary. >> there are a lot of things you can do in a forest that tend to make it easier it fight a fire like most importantly burning off the fuel during the wet season so there's less for the fire to feed on. to what extent in cal fire and all your other things do you encourage people to do things in their forest when you don't have a fire that make it easier and more effective in fighting the fire? >> it's an excellent question, sir. we spend a large time in cal fire on public education and prevention and also with respect to you were talking about fuel, the fuels program, or vegetation manage
and all over the country. synthetic fields do not mandate the use of the blark carbon in fill there and there less toxic alternatives but they make more money and make the association a little less money. in san carlos they used an alternative in a field of this size, so because of the vote of the individuals of this commission today the so called gift from city foundation and rpd and the play field and the ocean view neighborhood and the soccer leagues will be receiving will give a lifelong deliberately concealed cancer risk plain and simple. thank you. >> is there any other public comment on the consent calendar? please come forward. >> good afternoon commissioners. general manager. this topic is another shining example of the progressive politics that allow the miserable status quo to survive, and it's not about what is right or wrong for the citizens and taxpayers of san francisco. it's just about getting over on them, and no matter what the issue is this commission, this recreation and park department will find a reason to go against it because that is its modus opera
humanitarian exchange. it's been a wonderful way for us to work together on some of these common issues and figure out how our agencies are all going to integrate. i think the time and effort that has been expended by both the military planners and also the civilian planners is definitely going to be bearing fruit in years to come when something happens. i know we are quite a bit ahead of time, you are going to have a 20-minute break from now and then our next speaker will come up at that point. thank you again. he heads the baur row of medicine for the navy. i lacked at his bay oh in the program, educated in georgia and he's had a great career in the navy commanding several hospitals, winning several awards and his most recent command was as the commander of walter reed, and i was so glad that he was here to hear the panel that we had with our medical peer to peer exercise. and he's going to talk to us now about navy medicine. with that, please help me welcome vice admiral matthew nathan. (applause). >> thank you, general, very much. well, it's a pleasure here and i'm honored to b
have good situational awareness what's going on in the state of california. they normally put us in an alert stat us so we're prepared to respond in an attack mode. i don't often work with chief chaney in southern california, about a month ago we had 9 aircraft at our peak working fires throughout northern california if that answers your question. >> any other responses? >> i wanted to touch -- can you hear me now? i wanted to touch on that last topic as far as the command control because what we have here in the marine corps is similar to the navy. we have the installation, the regional installation command and also partners with the operational foresite. we allow the operational foresight, we maintain those but then we coordinate, cooperate, with the operational foresight once the call comes in for support. so we're able to do that obviously through memorandum of understandings and we have agreements and our wing operating orders allow for the fact the operational control, at least under operational response, maintains with the operators. the third aircraft wing maintains
to be better than us after a bunch of trades. the los angeles dodgers are -- all right. the giants. they're down to two games of cincinnati. they win three straight. the reds are? >> audience: out of here! >> it has to be louder for the next two. are you ready? the giants go to st. louis and need to win there and back home. the st. louis cardinals are? >> audience: out of here! >> now for the big one. the mighty american league detroit tigers. you ready? the detroit tigers -- they are? audience: out of here! >> you never disappoint. here is my partner mike. >> well, we have become an organization of expertation. there's expectation when you win a championship in 2010 and there is expectation when you get in that ballpark everyday and it's over flowing with your love and affection and there is purity in the formula that this organization goes about trying to meet those standards of excellence. it starts with the fans of historians that we call investors that kept us here in san francisco and goes to the front office comprised of men and women dedicating their lives to this team
there are 24 of these that have been completed with this one, and the proper use of our library bonds program from beginning from the year 2000 with the great partnership of dpw and so forth. there are more great partnerships to be guilt because guess what we're doing with the bonds that publicly improves, we're honoring these kids' future. this is a place where there is going to be invent, sharing, yes, exploring, meeting, oh, gosh, what else did we miss? >> meeting. >> instructor: yes, meeting and sharing and exploring and inventing and reading. of course. we're just going to have so much of this and i'm so happy to be working with the supervisors who also know this. because we're working together on things that you believe in. and i'm waiting for the chance, when board president chiu and scott wiener have their kids and when they come to north beach branch library, they will remember this day, when they bring their kids up to the front and say mayor lee and luis herrera and everybody worked together to get this done. and, by the way, more is to come when we all work together. because to
're doing in terms of retaliation and violence among themselves. allow the police department to use the technology that they have and do police predictable policing and getting them the tools and the support from the rest of the city that they can do better predictive policing when it comes to crime patterns in the city and what is going on, but the most important part and you will hear this from the chief, from deanna and myself is the community organizing. that the strength of any program is investment in our people and that means organizing our communities, faith base communities and different organizations, the tenants right here in sunny dale, the residents here in this valley, all around mclaren park for example and get them organized and working with the community organizations that we fund, with our city department including first five and our human services department, our health department and others all engaged in the same direction with our faith base community to make sure we're working on all the programs and signal to people violence is not the answer. that we have
charlie. the previous day general hughes had briefed us that the chinese military were to begin extensive military maneuvers in the taiwan strait. this morning we were stunned to learn that they had fired two missiles that landed just 10 miles off the coast of taiwan. the taiwanese had a presidential election underway, and the chinese were using a not too subtle way of explaining to them what they wanted the outcome of that election to be. thises was an unacceptable form of military coercion and both the general and i agreed that a strong response was needed by the united states, something more than a diplomatic letter of protest. after some discussion we agreed to send two carrier battle groups to taiwan. within an hour the president had approved our recommendation and before the day was over, though carrier battle groups were underway steaming to taiwan. at a press conference the next day, i was asked would i not fear this would lead to military clash with china. i said, i was not concerned of that. and when asked why, i said, i think, well, because we have the best damn navy in the wor
concert, and also readings. >> give us this day our daily bread at least three times a day. and lead us not into temptation to often on weekdays. [laughter] >> meridians' stands apart from the commercial galleries around union square, and it is because of their core mission, to increase social, philosophical, and spiritual change my isolated individuals and communities. >> it gives a statement, the idea that a significant art of any kind, in any discipline, creates change. >> it is philosophy that attracted david linger to mount a show at meridian. >> you want to feel like your work this summer that it can do some good. i felt like at meridian, it could do some good. we did not even talk about price until the day before the show. of course, meridian needs to support itself and support the community. but that was not the first consideration, so that made me very happy. >> his work is printed porcelain. he transfers images onto and spoils the surface a fragile shes of clay. each one, only one-tenth of an inch thick. >> it took about two years to get it down. i would say i lose 30% of the
looking at where we are 25 years later in the bay area, looking at how hard it is for us to strive to keep our theater is going, etc. i like to think that i'm not struggling quite as hard, personally, but what i mean by that, the intention, the commitment. particularly, to produce works that would not be produced in other places, and also to really nurture women of color artists. i think that is something that has not shifted for me in those 25 years, and it is good to see that brava remains committed to that kind of work. ♪ >> when people talk >> feel like it really is a community. they are not the same thing, but it really does feel like there's that kind of a five. everybody is there to enjoy a literary reading. >> the best lit in san francisco. friendly, free, and you might get fed. ♪ [applause] >> this san francisco ryther created the radar reading series in 2003. she was inspired when she first moved to this city in the early 1990's and discover the wild west atmosphere of open mi it's ic in the mission. >> although there were these open mics every night of the week, they were su
love you provided us selling out all 89 home games and all the wonderful fanses, and i see some of you that traveled withed team, road warriors to make road games feel like home games. you inspired us. we know you filled this plaza on sunday when we were in detroit. we know you cheer friday your couches at home, from your neighborhood street parties and then throughout october with the city we lit up the city. it was a washid orange from coit tower to the ferry building to right here at city hall. what can we take away from our 2012 giants? i believe we can take away life lessons. vuch teachable moments for our children and our team did face challenges and whether facing injuries or newly acquired players or facing elimination game one after another. what were the life lessons? never give up no matter how high the mountain is to climb. have integrity and conduct yourself with professionalism. did this team do that? absolutely. play with a team with unselfish devotion. trust one another and love your team teammates and in always do so have fun and it's meant to be played a
to the right of us here. everybody is so excited. and they really are gathered all over to see the world series champ. we're standing at a security checkpoint but we're going to go get an exclusive and check out the press risers. so, let's go. thousands of fans in the crowd, everyone is so excited. how are you guys doing? [cheering and applauding] >> everyone is excited at city hall. they've got a huge seating area out front here to make sure everybody gets a good view of all the action. as you can see from the jumbo tron, the fa raid has already begun and the giants are working their way up market and they're going to end up here at civic center. they've got so much media here and nine camera productions. look at this huge train they've got here. the anticipation is building. the giants are almost here. everyone is ready for their arrival. the comcast crew is ready, and they've got two large sports cameras to capture all of the action. the commentators are here. they're excited. they want to comment. we're excited. the fans are excited. should be about 15 minutes or so till we see the giants.
there's a little girl or little by or grandmother that is counting on us to get it right. so i thank you in advance for that young boy, that young girl, that family, whose lives will be changed, whose lives may even be preserved, because of your efforts. thank you for inviting me here today, thank you for allowing me to learn from you, thank you for allowing me it share a little bit about what we do and mostly to simply say thank you, it was my pleasure to be here, secretary schultz, thank you, admiral beeman, thank you. ladies and gentlemen, that's all i have. if you have any questions i'll be happy to take them. response and recovery. and the moderator for this panel is the city administrator for the city and county of san francisco, naomi kelly. please help me welcome naomi kelly. (applause). >> good afternoon, everyone. thank you for having me here today. again, i'm naomi kelly, city administrator for the city and county of san francisco and it's an honor to be participating in this important panel discussion on the uss macon island. over the course of the next 50 minutes, we wi
and 1 dollar from all of us. that can really help and donate at red cross .org and we thank you for your generosity. it was just two years ago that we captured the championship since moving to san francisco and i think we're happy we didn't have to wait until 52 years. [cheers and applause] we've got another trophy in this great city by the bay. [cheers and applause] so today giants fans once again you are all world champions and together we are giants, so we have a wonderful program planned for you today and i know you're anxious to get this started started and bring the guys out and celebrate your 2012 san francisco giants so let's get started. first of all we are joined by a number of special dignitaries who have helped to make san francisco one of the best baseball towns -- no, the best baseball town in america. [cheers and applause] let us now welcome and please show your love and enthusiasm the mayor of city and county of san francisco the honorable edwin lee. former mayor and current lieutenant governor the honorable gavin newsom. the city chief of protocol charlotte schultz,
the companies at tech sf they're going to use them as their principle place of landing their new recruits and this is why the commitment is so demonstrable, so i'm pactful for our city. a lot of political people will say "i promise you a job" and you never see it. we are doing all the basic things and i commit to those coming through tech sf and today we have the first class of 80 people. you're going to see these jobs coming into your hands because you're doing the right thing and you're creating the opportunity for yourself and we are matching it up with companies hiring in san francisco already and i tell you the members of sf city and ron's leadership and leadership of others and not only are they already looking for talent and working here, living here, having fun with your jobs and creating and inventing and getting other people on board this is the way our city should work. i want to thank you for joining on this announcement and i know we will hear from other speakers representing this and ron come on up. [applause] >> thank you mayor lee. it's an honor to be here and it's g
. and they're already recognized. they show some kind of people that i am not at all part of. but also, i use it may be after -- it inspired me. i love to make them all. the code of what is decent and a decent. what is elegant, not elegant. what is luxurious or not luxurious. changing to the time. >> let's talk now about one of the frontiers that you broke down. you're one of the first to do. you went into the streets of paris but not to the streets that we know that are in front of the palace but the streets with a very mixed community. in those days, even more so. and that inspired you to do collections. this was in a way breaking a parisian code, wasn't it? instead of pretending these immigrants were not there, you're actually inspired by their colors, their hair, their clothes, and you turn them into your collection. >> definitely. i was very inspired by different people always. maybe -- with me, i felt a little different. a project at school. for example, not doing football. i was more touched by people that are a little different or could be rejected. they inspire me also because i do n
too well, so they still had to use the facility but they housed the personnel in two tents out in front. their headquarters is one tent and their dorm is another tent and they welcomed us in there, didn't even think twice. and in the story of what it was like there, for a community of nearly 700,000 people, their complete complement of fire fighters that were on duty, their professional staff, was just over 40. they had 4 pieces of apparatus. the newest of which was over 10 years old. they kept it together literally with duct tape and baling wire and that's what they did every day. and i asked them, how was it after the earthquake. and he said, well, you know, most of them lost their homes too. nobody here was untouched. they all lost family in the rubble, they all lost their homes, but they all came to work. every one of them went out and worked every day until they got as many people recovered as possible and even then most of them just moved into the fire station because they didn't have anywhere else to go. and even then it didn't stop because now you have people l
ending than that, but i am going to use my chance just to ask one last question. do you believe that you have marked fashion history?
will be known for that as much as for the beauty of the close. thank you so much for giving us the chance to talk to you. [applause] ♪ >> welcome to hamilton recreation and aquatics center. it is the only facility that has an integrated swimming pool and recreation center combined. we have to pools, the city's water slide, for little kids and those of you that are more daring and want to try the rockslide, we have a drop slide. >> exercises for everybody. hi have a great time. the ladies and guys that come, it is for the community and we really make it fun. people think it is only for those that play basketball or swim. >> i have been coming to the pool for a long time now. it is nice, they are sweet. >> in the aquatics center, they are very committed to combining for people in san francisco. and also ensuring that they have public safety. >> there are a lot of different personalities that come through here and it makes it very exciting all the time. they, their family or teach their kids have a swim. >> of the gem is fantastic, there is an incredible program going on there, both of my
, and the county for building. for any athletic field and neighborhood parks, call 831- 5510. you can also write us at permits and reservations. or walking in and say hello at old log cabin, golden gate park. and of course you can find more information at sfrecpark.org.
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